3-Level Questioning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Different types of questions require different types of responses.  In general, there are three types of questions that we use when talking about literature:

 

Level One: Direct Questions

(Questions you can answer with information directly from the text)  

Examples:

            What was the name of Sam’s twin brother?

            Who did Piggy feel should be the leader of the boys?

            How many boys were shipwrecked on the island?

            

 

Level Two: Inferential Questions

(Questions you can answer by making inferences, or educated guesses, about the text)

Examples:

            Why are the boys unable to remain focused on being rescued?

            How does Simon expect the others to react to his seizures?

            What point is Golding making about the natural tendencies of unsupervised children?

 

Level Three: Thematic/Open-Ended Questions

(Questions that go beyond the text but are inspired by it—these are the kinds of questions found on standardized exams as well as in philosophical discussions)

Examples:

            Why are so many of us willing to exploit ourselves and others for fame?

            How much of our personalities are present at birth?

            How can a culture with a system of law and order claim to celebrate individuality?